Dragonfly in the garden


In this time of death and dying within my family, Mike’s picture portrait of a dragonfly brought tears of joy to my face. Please don’t let her fly away from you.

Mike Powell

I don’t often see dragonflies in a garden, but spotted this female Eastern Amberwing dragonfly (Perithemis tenera) amidst the flowers earlier this week at Green Spring Gardens. There were lots of male Eastern Amberwings buzzing around the small ponds in another location at the gardens in hopeful expectation of finding a mate.

I have the impression that female dragonflies like to hang out in a different area from the males and then make an appearance at a time of their own choosing.

Eastern Amberwing

© Michael Q. Powell. All rights reserved.

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Through the Looking Glass


Faces are hidden in a mirror

Far below a peaceful bridge

Masked among nature’s beauty.

 

Fallen through the looking-glass

Eyes serene, soft of green

With voices, that whisper our way.

 

Fingers of leaves brush nearby branches

Grasping hands regardless of color

Hear the wails within the wind?

 

Gaze beneath still waters

Where all of life coexist, do you see?

Why not us? Can’t we try? I wonder why?

 

Look closing to see mirrored images

Cup your ear to hear what they say

Thump…thump….thump…thump…thump…

 

Our hearts appear within the looking-glass

Beating proudly for all mankind

Future reflections of what may be?

 

Lying beneath a peaceful bridge

Eyes serene, soft of green

With voices, that whisper our way.

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Take Time to Play


Ohhh, if only I could have captured the playful dance scampering in the rain among the thatch of green! So mesmerized, I couldn’t look away. A silent whisper to my ear. “Do not move, for in a second the beauty of this may disappear.”

Gray skies hovered above flowered fields altering between drizzles and downpours during all of this past week. Temperatures fluctuated from the tip-top of hot before crashing to cool.

As I gazed out the glass to the back of my yard, sheets of light, steady rain continued to fall, creating a small stream. The shallow water swirled around a row of tall pines toward the willow tree. Suddenly a flash of colored honey caught my eye. 

As if Walt Disney himself waved his magic wand from above, a family of four left their little forest land to wander upon the soft carpet of my lawn.

One by one, a young buck of fuzzy horns, together with his beautiful doe and two spotted fawns slowly began to eat foliage while heaven’s showers fell upon their backs. She was on high alert, eyes darting in all directions while twins bounded out of sight. Suddenly, spindly legs scampered around the corner. 

The doe came closer to my patio, trying to reel her babies in, but they were having none of it. Instead, they began to tease her with play. She did not appear happy. Her tail of white raised straight up while she stomped her right front hoove. The fawns continued running back and forth in a zig-zag pattern right beneath the wet of their mother’s shiny black nose. 

Finally, the doe did something I had never seen before. She began to PLAY with the twins, imitating them two or three times by taking a few steps forward before backing up to wait for them to do the same. Which they did, before playfully running to and fro in front of her.  

The rain continued to fall, steady drops from the sky soaking all below, incouraging life to survive and thrive….and yes, even take time to play.

*photo rights http://www.curiousnaturalist.com and Google Chrome

Sweet Weeds of Future Inspiration


For several months my husband and I have been thinking about downsizing. Finding a house a bit smaller. Maybe even traveling to a warmer state? But in the back of my mind were smiles and giggles of grand-babies. How could I leave them? Then came an announcement that Grand-baby number six was on the way. The perfect package to rock under the Christmas tree. Still, we live about an hour away from my oldest son and his family. Even worse, we are more than states away from my youngest son and his brood of five who live in South Carolina.

Even our closest family is too far away to scoop our grand-babies up for an hour of play or take them for a ride through a shaded park. It’s nearly impossible for a spur of the moment visit. Rarely, are we able to watch our oldest grand-daughter jump off the balance beam or swirl and twirl in pink satin toe shoes. Everything we do together has to be pre-planned with much of their little lives passing us by. We simply live too far away….

So, a couple of months ago we decided to take the plunge. Make a move that will change the whole of our lives. Find a place to live that will give us more family time and allow us more time to travel too! I worked day and night to get our home ready for sale. No easy feat. Nowadays it must look like a magazine photo shoot. The old adage it true, “You only have one chance to make a good first impression.” After one showing we received a contingent offer which seems to be all wrapped up this week, allowing us to move on to the next phase. Panic has set in because I have no idea where I’m going, and I’m sad at the same time to leave my home. At the same time, I’ll be closer to my family which in the end will all be worth it.

I soon learned that sorting through boxes of memories stuffed in caramel colored cardboard is so very difficult. What to take to the next stage of life? Tape me up and tie me with a string! Of course, material possessions are not the most important thing. Relationships are. My family is, which is the reason for the move in the first place. And yet when I clasp a tiny clay bowl fired and glazed by my son nearly thirty years ago, how can I let go? Why do things like this touch me so?  Forever in the palm of my hand……

Although not finished yet, I’ve done a pretty good job of combing and dividing everything up. There are rows of boxes to take to the next house, wherever that may be, and other’s overflowing with treasures to be donated. Several cartons gently wrapped and packed with dolls carefully chosen for each grand-daughter, many of them handed down from my own mother. If only she were here to one day see joyous little faces pop pink peanuts from the very top! Currently, I’m in the midst of all the ‘fun’ stuff, calling for all inspections, making minor repairs, and praying I find a new home VERY SOON.

Before the end of summer, I’ll be leaving my cozy, turret office space where I’ve written words nearly every day for the last several years. And, yes, the back of my yard too, where deer, turkey, and other wildlife play. My little forest land where red cardinals and blue birds sing in the green of the trees will soon play lyrics for a family of new. They are the perfect couple to live here, which makes for a happy heart beating in my chest. I know the two of them will fill the brick walls of my home with warmth and love for years to come.

This morning, just after sunrise, I woke to walk Doodles where trees and grasses and weeds grow freely not so far away. The air was cool with a slight breeze that rejuvenated me from the inside to the out. Sunlight bounced off tips of trees, angling just right, allowing me to snap pictures of life others might not notice or simply pass by. I, on the other hand, wanted to lay among the damp grass, soaking every wet bead from each emerald blade into my pores while looking into the clear blue heavens above.

Sweet weeds of future inspiration……

 

Let’s Get In Formation!


Such a delight to Reblog this sweet story with a lovely photograph. https://throughopenlens.com/2016/05/17/lets-get-in-formation/

Through Open Lens

Mute Swan & Babies

F/ 7.1, 1/800, ISO 200.

Mute Swan and Cygnets

A three year old walked over to a pregnant lady while waiting with his mother in the doctors office.
He inquisitively ask the lady, “Why is your stomach so big?”
She replied, “I’m having a baby.”
With big eyes, he asked, “Is the baby in your stomach?”
She said, “He sure is.”
Then the little boy, with a puzzled look, asked, “Is it a good baby?”
She said, “Oh, yes. It’s a real good baby.”
With an even more surprised and shocked look, he asked…
“Then why did you eat him?”

Interesting Fact: Hans Christian Andersen’s fairly tale The Ugly Duckling chronicles the woes and triumphs of a young, Mute Swan that hatches in a clutch of duck eggs but goes on to become a beautiful swan. Some speculate that the book was based on Andersen’s own less-than-handsome looks as a…

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Magic Garden of Serenity


Colors splash so vibrantly

From ground or painted pots

Silent sounds near rainbow’s end

Bend my head, breathe a scent, intoxicate me

With beauty and beyond.

For every bloom my eyes now view

Tones and tints and hues are sent

Waving wand, casting spells, distance me

Not afar tranquility

The magic garden of serenity

In The Right Place At The Right Time


Waves of white foam lapped the edge of the sand before I noticed her. Upon her back she carried a dark greenish-brown and black shell of hard. Her back legs of two were elephant-like with paddles in front for digging, I presumed. Oblivious to the world surrounding her, Mama Turtle began to cross the width of the beach. Secrets of life-to-be were nestled within the softer inside of her.

Mama Turtle inched forward on a lengthy journey where a small crowd of MAN gathered ‘round her. When approaching too close, she stopped in damp tracks, not moving or looking back. Man retreated. Once safety was assured, Mama Turtle forged ahead.

With her hard shell of dark greenish-brown and black, Mama Turtle focused on a specific area of protected land just off the beach and over the dunes. Hills and valleys of buttery beige called to her. Grasses of wild grew and blew in the breeze. Tall with tips of emerald-green and colored in lime swayed, blowing breaths from the sea.

Watching Mama Turtle scale a small dune of sand was akin to Man climbing Mt. Everest. With every inch forward, sand flew up and above, to the right and to the left, before sprinkling back down to the ground. Mama Turtle struggled, forcing her heavy shelled body inches closer to her destination through the instinct of motherhood. Once she reached the summit, she stopped to munch on lavender wildflowers near blades of grass, low to the ground.  A few moments later, she disappeared over the first of the protected dunes. Once again, sand of dry rained from the clear of the sky, and although I could not see her, I knew that she would make it.

The gathering of Man had dispersed. I was the only one who stood on the beach during an early sunrise to witness nature’s miracle from beginning to end which spanned about 45 minutes. Earlier that morning, pictures were snapped from my balcony before I skipped out, unfortunately forgetting my camera phone. Still, the entire scene will forever play in my mind like a National Geographic Special.

In the right place at the right time….

 

 *Gopher Turtles are a dry land turtle protected by the Endangered Species Act. Often found in Florida, they can live up to 80 years. Gopher Turtles nest in burrows, laying 3-15 eggs the size of ping-pong balls. Only 5-10% survive.

http://www.defenders.org/gopher-tortoise/basic-facts

 **Sunrise and Beach pictures copyright, Kim Gosselin, 2016.  Gopher Turtle photographs copyrighted and protected by individual photographers, courtesy of Google Chrome.

 

The Rainbow


My heart leaps up when I behold

A rainbow in the sky:

So was it when my life began,

So is it now I am a man,

So be it when I shall grow old

      Or let me die!

The Child is father of the Man:

And I could wish my days to be

Bound each to each by natural piety.”

                                  William Wordsworth

rainbow-0457

Written 3/26/1802

Published: 1807

*Photograph courtesy of Google Chrome